Sunday Surprise


And from the Eclectica Bundle as well as some Curated Anthologies, ladies and gentlemen, please welcome back fellow worskhopper Debbie Mumford! 🙂

Where do you live and write from?

I make my home in the beautiful Pacific Northwest of the USA. Vancouver, Washington to be exact. No, not Vancouver, British Columbia, that’s in Canada, several hundred miles north of where I live. Vancouver, Washington is just across the Columbia River from Portland, Oregon, and in some ways, is a bedroom community to Portland.

As to the question of my writing, I don’t have an actual office. I write on a MacBook Pro laptop, sitting in my favorite chair in the living room … with my feet up. What can I say? I’m into comfort! With my body at ease, my mind is free to wander into other worlds and visit possibilities of existences other than our own.

Why do you write?

I’m an avid reader—I think most writers are—and I’ve always found myself saying, “Yes, but what if that happened?” At some point, I stopped wondering about nuances of other writers’ worlds and decided to create my own. It’s harder than you’d think, being the god of an imagined world, but at the same time, it’s exhilarating and freeing. When I’m really in the zone, I’m completely submerged in my story. Words rush from my subconscious through my fingers onto the screen without me being consciously aware of what I’ll write next. It’s like magic! Characters do things I hadn’t even dreamed of, and my surface mind wonders, “What will they do next?”

Ultimately, that’s why I write…to discover what happens next.

When did you start writing?

I can truthfully say that I wrote my first story before I could read. I dictated it to my mother and then illustrated it with crayon drawings!

Then came a LONG period of no writing other than school assignments and later, Christmas newsletters. I thought about writing often while I was raising my children, but time with them always took priority, so I didn’t truly start writing until my husband and I launched them out into the world. Then I sat down and wrote my first novel. I finished it, all 100,000 words, in a little over six-months and blithely sent it off to agents and editors, thoroughly expecting it to be snapped up immediately.
Yeah. Not so much. My novel was met with universal form letter rejections. I was so green, I didn’t even have a clue what I’d done wrong. At that point, I buckled down, found some writing mentors and began to learn my craft. Can anyone say “cart before the horse”? Definitely. But you don’t know what you don’t know, and at least I started and finished a novel and had the confidence to send it out. I also used the rejections as a goad instead of letting them defeat me.

What genre(s) do you write?

I’ve written a little bit of everything: fantasy, lots of romance (paranormal romance, fantasy romance, time-travel romance), historical fiction, and even a little bit of mystery. Recently, I’ve been branching out into science fiction, especially space opera. Oh, and I write contemporary young adult and middle-grade fantasy under a pen name: Deb Logan.

Interestingly enough, Debbie Mumford writes her tales in third person, while Deb Logan always writes in first person. Yep, I can honestly say Deb is channeling my inner child!

Tell us more about your book in the bundle

Tales of Tomorrow is a collection of five of short stories that move from science fiction to the edge of fantasy. The collection includes two “right around the corner” tales, one far flung space fantasy, and two stories of future families.

Tell us about your latest book (add link if published)

My most recent release is also a short story collection, Tales of Love and Magick. It includes tales that combine my enchantment with fantasy and my love of romance. Each of these ten tales blends the very human element of love, whether romantic, familial, or budding, with a fascinating bit of magick. I had great fun writing these stories, and I hope readers will enjoy them as well!
You can buy Tales of Love and Magick at most ebook retailers.

Any other projects in the pipeline?

I’m always imagining new worlds! I’m currently dreaming up a historical romance series based on Her Highland Laird, a time-travel novella I wrote a few years back. I also have several short stories in process for upcoming anthologies, and Deb Logan has a few fans clamoring for a follow-up novel to Thunderbird. After all, Coyote isn’t the most patient of totem animals. He’s ready to take center stage!

Barb’s P.S. I must say Debbie and I think alike. Look at her latest cover! She chose the same portal I used for Otherside, although I made quite a composite of that image! 🙂 But then, it’s a beautiful stock image…

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Random Friday


Another author who is in both curated anthologies sent me her answers. I would like to spend a few words on this one. She sent me Tethering the Sun first when I sent out the call for portal stories. Then I realized we were at the same workshop in 2017, although there were fifty people there and we barely talked. But we caught up and I requested also The Traveler from that list. So, ladies and gentlemen, please welcome another workshop buddy, C.A. Rowland!

They are both out now! Click on the image for the BUY links!

1. What is it about portals that draws you to it?
I love the idea of crossing into a new world, that wonder and unsettling sense of trying to deal with something new. Portals cause growth and I like exploring that aspect of learning about something new. I also love going to new lands and getting to know them and their people.
 
 
2. What is your story in the anthology about?
In Fantasy Portals, my story is about a woman who is drawn into a painting and has to deal with what that means and the choices she must make.
 
In More Portals, my story is about a woman at Machu Picchu who steps through a curtain of fog and finds a completely different Machu Picchu.
 
 
3. What inspired your story?
I think art is so inspirational. I have written a number of stories based on pictures or drawings or in this case, an oil painting that I saw in New Mexico. The artist’s work has stuck with me and I finally realized there was a story I wanted to tell about one of them.
 
 
4. Do you always write about portals?
If not, what do you write about? No, I write about places I have visited, places I’ve lived, historical stories, mysteries, science fiction and fantasy. I don’t know that I could ever write in only one genre or only one kind of story.
 
 
5. What should readers know about you?
My first mystery novel will be published in 2020, The Meter’s Always Running. The main character is a female taxi driving in Savannah, Georgia. I lived in Georgia for years and love the historic district. I live in Virginia now where the backdrop is the Civil War battlefields. I studied History in college so this is the right place for me and the area inspires me and my stories.
 
 
6. Is there anything else you’d like to tell us?
I love ghost stories too. I stayed with my grandmother when I was small and both my parents worked. We used to go to the local graveyard where she would weed and talk about the people she knew there. I would imagine what they looked like, where they lived and what their lives were like. Those sometimes show up in my stories as well.

Random Friday


And again, since Sundays are busy with Eclectica authors, a short summary of the More Portals authors who answered my 6Questions. Check also this guest post on Library of Erana. Ladies and Gentlemen, from More Portals Debbie Mumford and Lana Ayers!

DEBBIE MUMFORD
1. What is it about portals that draws you to it?
Fantasy is my genre of choice, and one of the elements of fantasy that has always fascinated me is thresholds. Whether it’s a threshold of light (dusk and dawn – the thresholds between day and night, light and dark), or of place (I’m particularly drawn to beaches – that place where it’s not quite land, not quite ocean), or that magical witching hour: midnight (is it today or tomorrow … or neither?). Thresholds are magical, and a portal, well it’s definitely a threshold and in some ways, the highest form of magic! After all, a portal can transport you from here to … well, that’s the question, isn’t it?
2. What is your story in the anthology about?
My story (Beneath and Beyond) is a science fantasy about two scientists who discover an ancient door buried far beneath the polar icecap. When their team manages to open it, the scientists discover the unbelievable.
3. What inspired your story?
“Beneath and Beyond” was written in response to a challenge from my writing group: write a story that combines science and fantasy. Voilà! “Beneath and Beyond” was born!
4. Do you always write about portals? If not, what do you write about?
I write about all sorts of things! From dragon-shifter fantasy romance to space opera to time-travel romance to historical fiction, if an idea pops into my brain, I embrace it and write. I write for general adult audiences as myself (Debbie Mumford), but I also write for kids and teens as Deb Logan — by channeling my inner child!
5. What should readers know about you?
I’m a wife and mother … and grandmother! I’m an only child with five older brothers (really! My brothers ranged from nine to eighteen when I was born), and I’m a mother of twins. Family is very important to me and figures prominently in my writing.
I love dogs, am fond of cats, and have been known to befriend dragons … Chinese Water Dragons to be specific!
6. Is there anything else you’d like to tell us?
I love to hear from readers! I hope you’ll visit my website (debbiemumford.com) and consider subscribing to one or both of my newsletters. Both Debbie and Deb give new subscribers FREE stories for joining their lists!

LANA AYERS
1. What is it about portals that draws you to it?
Ever since childhood, when I felt alien and other, waiting for my true non-earthling people to come and collect me somehow, I’ve been drawn to the idea of portals. Portals are escape hatches from mundane experience into the extraordinary.
2. What is your story in the anthology about?
My story “Sideways” is about a woman a little too focused on the past to see what is right in front of her. On an ordinary workday, her experience in a portal, forces her to shift perspective.
3. What inspired your story?
The portal in “Sideways” was inspired by a dream I had where things immediately went awry.
4. Do you always write about portals? If not, what do you write about?
In the purest sense, all stories are portals to new experiences. But time travel is my favorite kind of portal to read and write about. Writing poetry, which for me is a portal to the inner emotional realm, is another of my vices.
5. What should readers know about you?
Growing up in a one-tv household with an older brother who controlled what we watched is how I became a Fantasy & Sci Fi geek. My brother gifted me the universe and beyond, and for that, I am forever grateful.
6. Is there anything else you’d like to tell us?
Here’s a quote from author Deb Caletti that nails one of life’s best true portals: “I understood right from the start that every set of library doors were the sort of magic portals that lead to other lands.”
http://LanaAyers.com

Sunday Surprise


Rocketpack Adventures Sunday Special! Revered Guests, here are eight fearless authors answering six questions about this  anthology, available as ebook and paperback. Get it now!

AUTHOR/CURATOR RUSS CROSSLEY

1. What is it about rockets and/or jetpacks that draws you to it?

I fell in love with the idea of jet or rocket packs in the early 1970’s when I saw part of an old serial on a children’s morning program. Looking back I think it was 1949’s King of the Rocketmen. Then the 1991 film The Rocketeer reignited my interest in this subgenre of fantastic film (a long time love of mine). I now own all the old serials with rocket suited heroes and of course the Rocketeer on DVD. The whole idea is so much fun I decided to compile a collection of stories by various authors to see how other authors might approach the idea. And, boy, did they ever write some clever tales. I hope everyone enjoys these stories as much as as I do.

2. What is your story in the anthology about?

Mine is called Mercenary Knights. It is about rocket pack wearing knights jousting on antigravity boards in the 42nd century. Of course there is danger, action, and peril and a cliffhanger ending as is fitting for this genre with a surprising twist. Great fun to write my own rocketpack story.

3. What inspired your story?

As it happens I have an ongoing series of books about team of mercenaries set in the 42nd century and two of the team love to compete in outrageous, and dangerous sports. It occurred to me why not jousting knights wearing rocketpacks? This provided me the perfect frame work for the story.

4. Do you always write about rockets and/or jetpacks? If not, what do you write about?

No, not much,. At the moment I’m in the process of finishing the seventh book in the Blaster Squad series and have plans to write a paranormal mystery next.

5. What should readers know about you?

My professional writing career started when I sold three Star Trek stories to Pocket Books.

6. Is there anything else you’d like to tell us?

I have a large collection of Star Trek fiction dating back to the 1970’s. Science fiction has been one of my passions for most of my life inspired by the US Space Program in the 1960’s and the seemingly inevitable goal of peaceful space exploration of my generation.

AUTHOR MARY JO RABE

1. What is it about rockets and/or jetpacks that draws you to it?

The idea of getting away, leaving the solar system, galaxy, or even universe.

2. What is your story in the anthology about?

An efficient engineer builds her own rocket.

3. What inspired your story?

In my Blue Sunset collection I have poems about life on Mars. One of them deals with an efficient engineer leaving Mars in her own rocket.

4. Do you always write about rockets and/or jetpacks? If not, what do you write about?

I write science fiction, some fantasy, and some historical fiction, all with different topics and themes.

5. What should readers know about you?

I prefer to write optimistic fiction with happy endings because that’s what I like to read.

6. Is there anything else you’d like to tell us? I am very amazed and grateful to be in this bundle.

Personal blog: https://maryjorabe.wordpress.com/

Publishing blog: https://teedsgalaxypress.wordpress.com

Website: http://www.teedsgalaxypress.com

AUTHOR LESLEY L. SMITH

1. What is it about rockets and/or jetpacks that draws you to it?

Rockets and jetpacks are super fun. I think it goes back to the ideas of the golden age of science fiction–when everyone was jetting around. I wish I had a jetpack right now!

2. What is your story in the anthology about?

My story “Girl Power” is the tale of a group of girls inventing a wearable jetpack.

3. What inspired your story?

I must admit I’m on a bit of a ‘girl power’ streak this year.  I love the idea of girls becoming empowered–in more ways than one!

4. Do you always write about rockets and/or jetpacks? If not, what do you write about?

I often write about rockets and spaceships, but my stories are really about characters and their relationships in science fictional settings.

5. What should readers know about you?

Readers should know that in real life I’m a physicist, and have worked on a NASA project (so, am a rocket scientist?). 😉

6. Is there anything else you’d like to tell us?

This particular anthology has been super fun and all the stories are marvelous. For more info, check out my website: www.lesleylsmith.com

AUTHORS/CO-WRITERS JIM LE MAY AND CHUCK ANDERSON

1. What is it about rockets and/or jetpacks that draws you to it?

Chuck- I had never written a jetpack story, and when Russ asked I was intrigued.

Jim – Honestly, I had never thought of writing a story about jetpacks until my co-author, Chuck Anderson, brought the idea up. It sounded like fun to write and indeed was.

2. What is your story in the anthology about?

Chuck – Jim and my story is about a down-on-his-luck hero during the Great Depression who is recruited by a former gunfighter to fight against crime.

Jim – International intrigue in the pre-WWII era, a sexy female Nazi spy, Alcatraz island in the San Francisco bay and a heroic jetpack pilot.

3. What inspired your story?

Chuck – The old television show ‘Have Gun- Will Travel.’ I wanted a character who’s for hire but generally tries to do the right thing.

Jim – Partially, the late ’50s TV show “Have Gun — Will Travel” and in part the ’90s film “The Rocketeer.”

4. Do you always write about rockets and/or jetpacks? If not, what do you write about?

Chuck – I have not written a jetpack story before, and I usually write under a bunch of different areas of science fiction.

Jim – That was my first jetpack story, though Chuck and I might write another. I usually write about future history or gonzo versions of fairy tales and other stories.

5. What should readers know about you?

Chuck – I am a publisher, writer, and an art student, but I used to be a teacher, volleyball coach, and an athletic director. I also have a weakness for muscle cars.

Jim – I write character-driven short stories and novels, most of them set decades or centuries in the future after antibiotic-resistant bacteria has drastically reduced the earth’s population.

6. Is there anything else you’d like to tell us?

Chuck – I think this is going to be a fine collection of stories, and I can’t wait to read the rest of them.

Jim – Yes. You can access my blog here: https://www.lemaysshadowworld.com/ , find my books at Mad Cow Press (https://www.madcow.press/ ) and Amazon (https://www.amazon.com/Jim-LeMay/e/B076MGDHFC ).

AUTHOR  KELLY CAIRO

1. What is it about rockets and/or jetpacks that draws you to it?

Flying. My best dreams include me figuring out I can fly. And it’s wonderful. (Also, as a tourist on a helicopter flight, I was delighted to realize if felt exactly like flying in my dreams.)

2. What is your story in the anthology about?

Without giving too much away, it’s about differences and similarities and communication.

3. What inspired your story?

As a kid, I never understood why anyone would consider creating an all-boy or all-girl school. As, er, not a kid, I do understand the appeal of every single opportunity not influenced by stereotypes. (However, I remain grateful I never experienced the all-girl school first hand.)

4. Do you always write about rockets and/or jetpacks? If not, what do you write about?

Most of my published work is sci-fi — time travel, Star Trek, and steam punk — and paranormal romance. And I enjoy reading and writing anything that offers a twist.

5. What should readers know about you?

I love the idea of helping people through what they read. Whether it’s providing a half hour of entertainment as reading/relaxation time, or providing a perspective on something a reader thinks about outside of the story — that is the fun of story telling.

6. Is there anything else you’d like to tell us?

For a good time, check out free samples of my Guardian Angel series. It’s paranormal romance, so the stories are under the Lynn C. Kelly pen name, and available at Amazon and Barnes & Noble. There’s a complete, free short story written from the point of view of the guardian angel (parallel to the novel), plus a sample of the novel that (I hope) will make you ask yourself, “What now?”

AUTHOR DEANNA KNIPPLING

1. What is it about rockets and/or jetpacks that draws you to it?

I love all things pulp.  I watched a million episodes of Flash Gordon as a kid, that’s probably where it started.  Rockets…well, they’re okay.  Space rockets, they can be great.  But jetpacks are so impossible from a practical point of view that you can only think of them as belonging to another reality, one where all our problems have been, or will be, improbably solved by technology.  Maybe that’s the modern version of a fairy tale, I don’t know.  But I’ve always liked that sort of thing.

2. What is your story in the anthology about?

Jetpacks!  And the fact that a lot of our early rocket scientists were former Nazis that we raided out from under the USSR’s nose.  Maaaybe a little unethical testing went on.  Who’s to say?

3. What inspired your story?

I started on a different story that turned into a 100,000-word novel, or at least it will at some point.  Phooey!  I still wanted to write a story for the anthology, so I borrowed some of the characters from the book and sliced off a smaller chunk of story to play with.

4. Do you always write about rockets and/or jetpacks? If not, what do you write about?

I write science fiction, fantasy, horror, and crime.  A lot of aliens, fae, and monsters.

5. What should readers know about you?

Hahahahaha…that’s assuming they really should know anything.  I like pushing readers’ buttons, so maybe it’s best for everyone concerned if they don’t.  Anyway, my website is at www.WonderlandPress.com.  I’m obsessed with Alice in Wonderland and there happens to be more cannibalism in my stories than maybe there should be.  I live in Colorado.  I am not a direct descendant of anyone involved in the Donner Party, though, in case you were wondering.

6. Is there anything else you’d like to tell us?

I have a blog series of free flash fiction stories running during October.  This year, the theme is “normal things gone wrong.”  You can find Tales of the Normal here.

My latest release is under a pseudonym, Dean Kenyon, two books in a series of near-future detective thrillers full of sarcasm, serial killers, and self-driving cars.  You can find those here.

AUTHOR AND BLOG HOST BARBARA G.TARN

1. What is it about rockets and/or jetpacks that draws you to it?

Actually, it’s my first story with jetpacks and I had a lot of fun writing it, so I must thank Russ for requesting a story with rockets and/or jetpacks! 🙂

2. What is your story in the anthology about?

It’s one mission of the Lone Wolves Team, a group of solitary people who teamed up to work. They call themselves the problem-solvers of the Star Nations, and at the beginning the team is an enhanced Humanoid, a telepathic assassin, a hacker and a starship pilot. This mission focuses on Hariel and Icy Aya , since they’re the right ones for this job.

3. What inspired your story?

The characters inspired the whole series of short stories about a Lone Wolves Team. They’re all quite introverted (except the starship pilot, Shanell) and I like watching them work together. Other loners will join in future episodes. The Star Minds Lone Wolves Team stories are currently (as of 2018) unpublished except the first mission, Wonder Man – included in Hacker (Star Minds Lone Wolves book 3) and the one in this anthology, the rest will come out sometime in 2019

4. Do you always write about rockets and/or jetpacks? If not, what do you write about?

I write mostly science fiction and fantasy (actually, science fantasy more than sci-fi, but my models are Star Wars and Star Trek, not hard SF). This short story belongs to the Star Minds Universe, then there’s Silvery Earth (secondary world fantasy), Future Earth (just started, including some Post-Apocalypse Chronicles) and Vampires Through the Centuries (historical fantasy).

5. What should readers know about you?

I’m a prolific one-draft writer, and there’s plenty for you to discover at www.unicornproductionsbooks.com or on my blog https://creativebarbwire.wordpress.com. And if you want a glimpse of the artist (I’m a professional writer and hobbyist artist), find me on Deviantart https://www.deviantart.com/creativebarbwire

6. Is there anything else you’d like to tell us?

I guess I rambled enough. Enjoy this anthology curated by my wonderful writer friend Russ Crossley!

Rocketpack Adventures ebook universal link and paperback.

Sunday Surprise


(already posted on the Facebook page)

Six Questions for Nightly Bites – Author Lesley L. Smith

1. What is it about vampires that draws you to them?

Of course, vampires have been popular for over a hundred years and they have been used as metaphors for a variety of things including AIDS, homosexuality, class warfare and more. In my opinion, however, I think people like the idea of living forever. They like to imagine they’ll never have to age or die. Vampires let us experience this vicariously.

2. What is your story in the anthology about?

“A Study in Scarlet” is about a vampire living in the future, on a spaceship, when a murder occurs. Not surprisingly, a vampire is pretty handy to have around when blood is spilled (if he can keep control over himself)! Without giving too much away, the protagonist does use his special skill to good effect.

3. What inspired your story?

This story actually encompasses horror, science fiction, and mystery! Yes, I got a little carried away with genres. I started out wondering about the strange and horrible idea of globules of blood floating in zero gravity.
In addition to floating globules, my story was inspired by the wonderful Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes novel of the same name, from 1887. It doesn’t get any better than Sherlock Holmes.

4. Do you always write about vampires? If not, what do you write about?

While I enjoy horror and mystery very much, I primarily write science fiction. I really enjoy the combination of science’s rationality with fiction’s imagination.

5. What should readers know about you?

In real life I’m a physicist and I’m a little obsessed with quantum mechanics right now. A lot of my fiction seems to have quantum mechanics in it. Since I’m also a woman and a lot of my fiction has female protagonists, the combo of physics and kick-ass women surprises some readers. But, I believe in following the muse, and my muse wants to show all kinds of people that science can be a fun adventure THEY can do.

6. Is there anything else you’d like to tell us?

I’m honored to be included in Nightly Bites! Thanks for the opportunity!

Six Questions for Nightly Bites – Author Barbara G.Tarn

1. What is it about vampires that draws you to them?

I had read the first three of Ann Rice’s books and enjoyed the movie “Interview with the vampire” (1994) but then I got bored with the whole topic – too horror/gory for my tastes. Some fifteen years later I went back to the bloodsucker stories through Joleene Naylor’s Amaranthine series, and even read Dracula (I didn’t enjoy the movie much, so I didn’t read the book until 20 years later).

2. What is your story in the anthology about?

It’s set in the 12th century, starting at the siege of Damascus during the second crusade, and ending in Lincolnshire, where Baldwin was born. He’s one of the shortest-lived fledglings of Bran the Raven, a millenarian bloodsucker of Celtic origins.

3. What inspired your story?

In all the “Vampires Through the Centuries” stories, I like to explore moments in history through vampires. The other very short story in the anthology shows an 18th century Maratha soldier turned into a bloodsucker after a battle and even more short-lived than Baldwin! The long-lived ones (Rajveer, Kaylyn and Shashank) allow me to explore centuries of history, which is very funny and entertaining.

4. Do you always write about vampires? If not, what do you write about?

I had only one “Bloody Story of Vampires” (that I may include in “Nightly Bites Volume 2”) before starting “Vampires Through the Centuries”, and that’s just one of my series. I write mostly fantasy – historical in the above example, secondary world fantasy (Silvery Earth), science fantasy (Star Minds), urban fantasy (body switches) – and some science fiction and every now and then a contemporary story (but the present doesn’t inspire me very often).

5. What should readers know about you?

I’m a professional writer and hobbyist artist! I did comics and some of my own covers covers, and I dream of an illustrated book for adults or ten. My influences come mostly from movies and comics, more than books, so my prose is quite dry and I don’t write long epics, hence I gave up traditional publishing that required 100K opuses in my preferred genre…

6. Is there anything else you’d like to tell us?

It was fun to put together this anthology and I look forward to working on Volume 2!

Six Questions for Nightly Bites – Author Joleene Naylor

1. What is it about vampires that draws you to them?

Vampires can be anything. They can be scary, romantic, thoughtful, sad, happy – a vampire author can do a period piece, a contemporary story, even a sci-fi, and use the same universe. In the Amaranthine universe, I’ve written stories that span from the 1600s to modern times, I’ve written shorts about losing loved ones, about playing poker, about revolts, wars, death, and even about a child vampire looking for a playmate. Writing vampires gives me so much freedom, and they’re immortal, so you can really dig into character development.

2. What is your story in the anthology about?

It’s the origin story of Verchiel, one of my most popular characters. Kateesha, his master, botched the turning and when he wakes in an inn, he has no idea who he is or who she is, and he doesn’t remember being human.

3. What inspired your story?

I’m working on a series of Executioner stories – the Executioners are the police in my vampire world. I already knew a little about Verchiel’s turning, so I thought it would be fun to find out the rest.

4. Do you always write about vampires? If not, what do you write about?

For the most part, yes, because my fans aren’t really interested in me as a person, but rather in the characters and the universe. However, I am working on a fantasy novel with my brother.

5. What should readers know about you?

I have a lot of free short stories available. A. Lot. Like more than fifty. Most of them can be read as stand alones, though of course they’re better if you’ve read the Amaranthine series. You can find the full list on my website at JoleeneNaylor.com.

6. Is there anything else you’d like to tell us?

Okay, quirky fact: I love stuffed animals, and treat them like they are sentient beings part time. They all have their own personalities, and relationships with one another, etc. etc. Their society has been set up since I was a kid (my mom used to talk them for us), and I think that’s where a lot of my imagination and characterization abilities come from.

Six Questions for Nightly Bites – Author Russ Crossley

1. What is it about vampires that draws you to them?

The immortal nature of the undead vampire fascinates me. If the vampire isn’t destroyed how do they survive the centuries?

2. What is your story in the anthology about?

My story takes place in an alternate future where the Confederate States won the US Civil War. The story centers around a female vampire and her sister who are rebelling against the Confederacy and the vampire leader and the consequences of their rebellion. It is a story about love, family, and courage.

3. What inspired your story?

I often wonder how if vampires took over the world what it might look like with these undead immortals in charge.

4. Do you always write about vampires? If not, what do you write about?

No, not all the time. These days I’m writing mostly space opera set in the 42nd century.

5. What should readers know about you?

I’ve written stories in many different genres including romantic comedy, mystery, science fiction, fantasy, and zombies to name a few and love to read in many genres of fiction and non-fiction. I read and write for characters than inspire me and they are always seeking some form of justice from their perspective. They love to right wrongs. For some reason I write many strong female characters though I am a male.

6. Is there anything else you’d like to tell us?

I am married to a writer, painter, and musician and my youngest son is an actor, playwright, and producer who has worked extensively in Europe and Asia. We are a very arts forward family and truly love what we do.

Sunday Surprise


And it’s another Sci-fi July author! And I even met him three years ago, yay! Ladies and Gentlemen, please welcome Michael W. Lucas!

Where do you live and write from?

I live in Detroit, Michigan, and write from my authorial garret above my family home. As garrets go, it’s pretty nice. I have running water and a view of the power lines.

Why do you write?

Because I love doing it. I love telling stories. Good writing is clear thinking, and while my brain is usually full of mud writing forces me to sieve away the muck and produce clarity.

When did you start writing?

I was four when I discovered that books were not a gift from On High. They were produced by people–real people, not, like, TV stars or Presidents. People like me.

So I started writing books. And annoying my relatives and schoolmates with them. Now I get to annoy the world at large.

What genre(s) do you write?

As Michael Warren Lucas, I write SF and crime novels. I’m probably best known for the Immortal Clay books: a play off of Carpenter’s amazing The Thing, but set after we lose. I write just about anything as short stories.

As Michael W Lucas, I write nonfiction technology books. Nonfiction provides
some interesting storytelling opportunities. My fiction and nonfiction writing each feeds off the other.

What is your goal as a writer and what are you doing to achieve it?

I am always looking to become a better writer. Every book I write, I’m practicing a particular skill.

Writing is my full-time job, so I have business goals too. I’m looking to boost the share of my income that comes from fiction. Each novel I write sells better than the last, so the solution is pretty clear: write more novels.

What is the best piece of writing advice you’ve ever been given?

Writing advice is a weird thing. What’s great advice for a beginner is terrible advice for a medium-stage author and irrelevant for an advanced author.

The best writing advice I’ve ever been given actually isn’t writing advice, it’s life advice: “Listen to the people who are doing the thing you want to do, the way you want to do it.”

Hanging around with other writers and talking about writing is great fun. I’m thrilled to hang out with more experienced authors, and I’ll happily chat with writers that aren’t as far along as myself. But I’m really choosy about whose advice I listen to.

Many people who can’t do a thing talk a really good game about the thing. That guy in your writing group who is full of comments about your use of passive voice and how you break up paragraphs, but who has never sold a dang thing?  He’s not providing useful information.

When someone tells you how your work made them feel, though: that is ALWAYS valid and useful. Always. It’s the most useful writing advice you’ll ever get.

Outliner or improviser? Fast or slow writer?

I always have an outline. Permit me to present the complete outline for my crime thriller “Butterfly Stomp Waltz.” It’s utterly full of
robbery and bloodshed and vengeance.

Anthony Bourdain:

  • Atlanta
  • Portugal
  • Myanmar

Yep, that’s it. Food and travel shows are great for researching foreign places. If you can make the reader taste the food in that little town in the back of the Myanmar jungle, they’ll believe you’ve been there.

My writing speed depends entirely on the project. The novel I’m currently writing, a sequel to BSW called Terrapin Sky Tango, is being difficult.

Tell us more about your book in the bundle

In the Montague Portal series, the Montague Corporation has figured out how to leap into alien universes with different natural laws. Unfortunately, not all of those universes like humans.

More unfortunately, we bring human nature with us.

Mind rotting from an incurable prion disease? Go to a universe where the disease cannot progress, and get attacked by aliens (No More Lonesome Blue Rings). Or be among the first to visit a universe, solve a robbery, and save the world. (Sticky Supersaturation). There’s a universe where density varies linearly and there’s no ground… more specifically, no grounds for murder. (Forever Falls).

Montague Portal is kind of Star Trek, but every story has a built-in excuse to change how everything works.

Hydrogen Sleets is set in a universe exactly like ours, but it’s only about half a billion years after the Big Bang. The universe contains only hydrogen atoms screaming past at half the speed of light and a 1960s-style space station made of spinning concentric rings. It’s not just a SF mystery where our heroine needs to figure out why people are going insane and attacking the station; it’s a corporate procedural, where the frustrations of working for a company form part of the story. With laser guns, and forbidden shwarma.

It’s a perfect book for the Sci-Fi July Bundle. I was thrilled to be asked.

Tell us about your latest book

I describe git commit murder as “If Agatha Christie ran Unix cons.” If you work in the computing industry, if you’ve ever been to a computer conference, this book is for you.

Any other projects in the pipeline?

I’m currently writing a sequel to Butterfly Stomp Waltz, called Terrapin Sky Tango. Yes, I’m watching a few Anthony Bourdain episodes for that one. Plus a new, big nonfiction book.

Non-fiction Author

Fiction Author

Sunday Surprise


And it’s a guest! She was kind enough to interview me on her blog, so I thought I must reciprocate! Ladies and gentlemen, please welcome Mercedes Fox!

01.3 book ipad 2Where do you live and write from?

I live in Colorado and write from here as well.

Why do you write?

I’ve always wanted to be an author since childhood.

What genre(s) do you write?

I write horror. I’m toying with the idea of trying out a mystery but I feel like a fish out of water if there isn’t guts splashing all over the place.

Do you put yourself in your stories?

I do use people I know for some characters. Though I change their names and don’t make it obvious. It is to me. In my second book Life After: Werewolf Domination some of the characters, okay, all of the characters are friends and family at the core.

Tell us about your latest book

My latest book is Poaching the Immortal: Vengeance of the Werewolf book 2. Like it’s predasscer this book is violent and bloody. It deals with Ted, a character from Vengeance, who goes on a hunting trip only to find out the other hunters are hunting him.

Indie publishing or traditional publishing – and why?

I’m an indie publisher for a few reasons. First, I can get my book out right now. Second, I don’t have to seller my rights to a big publisher who then guts my work. Third, I don’t want to deal with publisher rejection.

_____________________________

Author Photo NEWwhere to find Mercedes:

Facebook

Twitter

Blog

Website

Amazon

Goodreads

Book Link: Poaching the Immortal

 

Sunday Surprise


unnamedAnd it’s a guest! From the upcoming Ink Slingers Halloween Anthology (I go the Smashwords link yesterday and no time to start reading it, so stay tuned for more), ladies and gentlemen, please welcome Russ Towne!

Where do you live and write from?

I live in Campbell, California, USA. It is near San Jose and San Francisco. I write from wherever I might be at the time the seed of an idea is given to me and begins to grow.

Why pg27do you write?

There are actually several reasons I write. I write because I must. I’ve learned story ideas are precious gifts and to gratefully document and share them. I believe it would be selfish of me to horde or ignore them. Sometimes when I’ve tried the latter it was as though a great and growing pressure built inside me to the point where I could no longer think or function until I let the ideas out and shared them with others. So, I write to function and survive.
I write to provide a greater balance my life. I’m a wealth manager at a firm I founded in 2003. I spend much of my days using the logic portion of my brain. Writing helps me to maintain greater balance by allowing me to use the creative portion of my brain.
I write because to do otherwise would be to ignore the whispers of my heart. I’ve found ignoring my heart is always a bad idea.
I write to remind myself and readers of the greatness and goodness within ourselves and others.

51Td18sEtuL._AA160_When did you start writing?

I was over fifty years old and had convinced myself that I didn’t have a creative bone in my body. Then, about four or five years ago a friend named Denis Loiseau invited me to co-write a song with him. We had so much fun working together that we collaborated on several songs that were picked up by music industry executives from Nashville and Hollywood, and an invitation to go to Nashville to meet some music executives. Although we are receiving royalties for some of our songs, we are far from having made it to the Big Leagues of songwriters, but it has been a fantastic adventure and a whole lot of fun. Songwriting led to writing poetry, which led to writing children’s stories, and fiction and non-fiction stories, which led to writing three anthologies of my own stories, and compiling three anthologies featuring the work of forty or fifty other writers. It has been an exciting four or five years.

51-GufbUMHL._AA160_What genre(s) do you write?

Children’s stories, non-fiction stories, poetry, and fiction and flash fiction in a wide variety of genres including adventure, action, science fiction, speculative fiction, crime, thriller, paranormal, western, gold rush, utopia and dystopia.

What does your writing routine consist of?

The writing routine that works best for me is no routine. I write when the words flow so forcefully that I’m pretty much unable to think or do anything else. Sometimes the flow keeps me writing all night (which is less than ideal during the work week), and at other times I go months without writing a thing. I’ve learned if I’m patient the flow will return. Sometimes it starts as a trickle and grows, and at other times it’s a flash flood removing everything else in it’s path. I’ve tried to write without the flow but it feels too much like work, is frustrating, is rarely (if ever) productive, and wastes precious time. I love to have fun when I write or do anything else, and I have the most fun writing with the flow rather than trying to write in its absence. My favorite time and place to write is outdoors, especially at night in the Spring, Summer, and Fall. I especially love writing in the rain as I sit at a covered table with the rain splashing overhead and all around. I’m a bit of a Goldilocks writer in that I enjoy writing night or day in all kinds of weather, except when it’s too hot or too cold, but when it’s just right, I write. My Chocolate Lab Duke is nearly always at my feet keeping me company.

vg_cover-2What do you feel are your strengths as a writer?

I believe readers experience and feel a greater connection with my heart and spirit, the hearts and spirits of others, and most importantly, to their own. I often hear that something I wrote made a reader cry tears of joy or healing tears. I consider that the ultimate compliment, and am honored and humbled by such heart-felt feedback.

How have you developed these qualities?

I listen to the whispers of my heart. It is my North Star as a writer. It won’t lead me astray.

41fckWLZF7L._AA160_Where do you find your inspiration?

Inspiration often comes to me at the most inconvenient times and places, such as when I’m in bed preparing to sleep, in the bathroom, working outside, or driving. It is when my brain has calmed down a lot that I’m able to hear the heart whispers.

Do you put yourself in your stories?

Sometimes, especially for non-fiction, but often my fiction stories begin with an actual event or experience and I just let my imagination lead me from there. I believe starting from a real event enables me to more authentically describe all I felt and experienced.

41nFuaEKKEL._AA160_Outliner or improviser?

Yes. I do both depending on my need at the time, but even my outlines are often only created in my head. My favorite is free-form writing where I just start a story and let it take me where it needs to go. I’m often amazed at the ending and what I’ve experienced along the way. To me it’s like an incredible adventure on a mighty, fast-flowing, uncharted river in the jungle. I never know what is around the next bend or when my journey will end.

Fast or slow writer?

Fast. I get bored with long projects. I love for ideas to flow as water from a fire-hose and the challenge of capturing all I can as fast as I can.

for CSTell us about your latest book:
In the next five or six weeks I’m releasing four or five books and re-releasing one, so it’s tough to choose. They are children’s books except the re-release which is titled Touched. The latter features many of my speculative stories and flash fiction. I’m proud of all these books, but I’ll go with Touched as it probably reveals more glimpses of my heart and spirit in a single book than the others. Most of the stories are uplifting though often the protagonists have to go through harrowing experiences to survive. It is a celebration of the human spirit expressed in many ways and genres.

Indie publishing or traditional publishing – and why?

I began with Indie, but I recognize advantages and disadvantages of each, so some day may choose another path.

61mGm8f6TwL._AA160_Any other projects in the pipeline?

Beyond the several being released by October 31, the seeds of several other stories are sprouting in my brain. I plan to give to them more of the attention I believe they deserve after I get through releasing the ones I’ve already written.

What is your goal as a writer and what are you doing to achieve it?
My goal is completely selfish, simple, and aligns with my personal definition of success: To do what I love and to do it with love (for as someone once said, doing anything else is a wasted opportunity). That is success to me as a writer or anything else.

51Ukcy9ln7L._AA160_What is the best piece of writing advice you’ve ever been given? “

Write would you want to read, what would touch and entertain you.” I attempt to do that every time I write. I figure that over time like-hearted people will discover my stories and quickly feel at home. In reality, they’ll simply be feeling a greater connection with their own loving, beautiful, and compassionate hearts and spirits, and those of others, hopefully including mine.

__________________________

61PwxwKuucL._AA160_Russ Towne lives with his wife in Campbell, California. They’ve been married since 1979 and have three children and three grandsons. In addition to enjoying his family and friends, and his dual passions for investing and writing, Russ loves to spend time in nature, especially near rivers and streams that run through giant redwood groves, and near beautiful beaches. He enjoys watching classic movies, reading, and tending to his small fern garden and redwood grove. Russ manages the investments of the wealth management firm he founded in 2003. He has published fourteen books, eight of which are children’s books, with five more scheduled for release by October 31, 2015*.
 
Russ’s books can all be found on Amazon.com. His Amazon Author Page can be found at https://www.amazon.com/author/russtowne.
 
Purple Fox and the Heebie Jeebies*
The Grumpadinkles*
Zach and the Toad Who Rode a Bull*
Misty Zebracorn*
V. G. and Dexter Dufflebee*
Ki-Gra’s REALLY, REALLY BIG Day!
The Duck Who Flew Upside Down
Clyde and Friends
Clyde and Hoozy Whatzadingle
Clyde and I Help a Hippo to Fly
Rusty Bear and Thomas Too
Clyde and I
 
Children’s App Based on Characters from His Clyde Books:
Clyde and Friends children’s app developed by Gail Nelson using characters from Russ’s series of Clyde books: www.clydeandfriends.com scheduled for release via the Apple Store by October 31, 2015.
 
Russ’s Blog:
Clyde and Friends — www.clydeandfriends.com
Stay updated on Russ’s latest children’s books, apps, songs, and merchandise (featuring the animated characters that appear in his stories). Readers get sneak previews of special stories, background information about where his story ideas come from and how they are developed, and opportunities to help Russ prioritize the order in which his stories and books should be published, the look, and sometimes the names of some of his characters.
The titles of the books he has written or compiled, published, and released include:
 
Non-Fiction
From the Heart of a Grateful Man
Reflections of a Grateful Man
Slices of Life An anthology of the selected non-fiction stories of several writers.
 
Fiction
Palpable Imaginings An anthology of fictional short stories by several writers in various genres.
Touched Short stories and flash fiction
 
Poetry
Heart Whispers An anthology of the selected works of over 20 poets.
 
Books for Young Children:
Clyde and I
Rusty Bear and Thomas Too
Clyde and I Help a Hippo to Fly
Clyde and Hoozy Whatzadingle
The Duck Who Flew Upside Down
Clyde and Friends
Ki-Gra’s REALLY, REALLY BIG Day!
 
Russ has four blogs:
A Grateful Man (nonfiction uplifting posts) http://russtowne.com
A Grateful Man’s Poetry http://agratefulmanspoetry.com
Imaginings of a Grateful Man (fictional short stories) http://imaginingsofagratefulman.com
 Clyde and Friends (About writing children’s stories) http://clydeandfriends.com
Why Russ Writes
Russ hopes readers experience truth and kindness in his writing, to remind everyone of the greatness and goodness within ourselves and others.

Sunday Surprise


And it’s a guest! Smashwords Authors group monthly feature on Goodreads! Ladies and gentlemen, please welcome Elizabeth Grace Foley!

Corral Nocturne eBook CoverWhere do you live and write from?
I’ve lived my entire life in upstate New York.
Why do you write?
Perhaps…because I can’t help it? I’ve been making up stories in my head ever since I was a little girl, and as I grew older, the impulse to write them down and refine them into real, carefully-crafted fiction grew stronger and stronger. It’s just something that I love to do.
LeftHandKelly-eBookWebWhen did you start writing?
Technically, my first fiction writing was done on sheets of paper stapled together to make “books” almost as soon as I learned how to write. I was always writing something and occasionally daydreaming about being an author someday, but I really began to get serious about writing and developing my craft about seven or eight years ago, I think.
What genre(s) do you write?
Everything I write comes under the heading of historical fiction. I’ve written in several sub-genres or variations on the genre, though—Westerns are my main interest; I also write historical mystery, and I’ve written a few short stories set in other periods (i.e. the Civil War and Great Depression).
Mrs. Meade Volume One Front CoverWhat does your writing routine consist of?
My daily routine isn’t carved in stone; I like to do most of my actual sit-down writing in the morning when my mind is freshest. My projects have a basic routine, though—I handwrite the first draft, then type it and edit as I go. After having some family members and beta readers read it and give feedback, I do several rounds of edits as needed, both on paper and on the computer.
What do you feel are your strengths as a writer? How have you developed these qualities?
Well, I’ve been told by readers that my writing has an old-fashioned feel and authentic-sounding dialogue for historical fiction. If that’s so, I credit reading plenty of older literature all my life, which is great for making that sort of thing second nature. Personally, I think creating interesting, likable characters may be one of my strengths, possibly because it’s one of the things I enjoy most. Almost all of my stories begin with characters that I build the plot around.
RanchNextDoor_smallWhere do you find your inspiration? Do you put yourself in your stories?
To answer the first part of that—well, pretty much everywhere. Books, movies, history, life in general. History is one of my biggest inspirations. To the second part—ah, that’s the trick question for a writer! I’ve never deliberately based a character off myself, but I know bits of my personality and ways of thinking must creep into all different characters and stories inadvertently.
Outliner or improviser? Fast or slow writer?
I outline longer works to give myself a sense of where I’m going, but not too rigidly. For short stories I usually just make a list of scenes. And slow writer, definitely!
Wanderlust-Creek-smallerTell us about your latest book (add link if published)
My most recently published book is Wanderlust Creek and Other Stories, a collection of Western short stories. My personal favorite of the collection is the title story “Wanderlust Creek,” which is about a young rancher and his wife struggling to hold onto their land and their dreams in the face of adversity from without and within.
Indie publishing or traditional publishing – and why?
Indie. I learned about indie publishing at just the right time, after I’d been trying to find a way into the traditional short story scene, but struggling unsuccessfully to find markets that accepted the kind of story I was writing. A lot of things about it appealed to me: the aspect of creative control, the favorable royalty system, and no need to search for those markets.
Some+Christmas+Camo+Final+MediumAny other projects in the pipeline?
The fourth entry in my Mrs. Meade Mysteries series, The Silent Hour, will be releasing this fall. Right now I’m working on revising a historical/Western novel manuscript, but I know it’s going to need a lot more work, so there’s no timeline for its release yet. One day!
What is your goal as a writer and what are you doing to achieve it?
I’m better with short-term goals than I am with long-term. But my ambition has always been to write a novel, so the one big step I’m working toward is to make that a reality. I’d like to write any number of historical novels; I have plenty of ideas stored up. Right now I’m just working steadily away on the manuscript that I hope will be my first full-length novel, trying to make it the best work I know how to do.
War-Memorial-SmallWhat is the best piece of writing advice you’ve ever been given?
I’ve occasionally been plagued with doubts over whether what I was writing was “serious” enough or meaningful enough, especially compared to what other writers were doing. Then one day I saw this tweet by Austin Kleon, author of Steal Like an Artist: “Whenever I have tried to do what I thought was ‘serious’ it has thrown me off the scent of my own talents.” That was a big encouragement and relief to me—it’s encouraged me to focus on my own writing strengths and do what I find most enjoyable and meaningful, and not compare my work to others’ so much.
____________

Sunday Surprise


sog advertAnd it’s a guest! And an old friend, since her first interview came out with her first book that I loved (and it came out before more famous shades of gray was published – and it’s a completely different genre!)! So, here we are again, almost five years later, another six books for a great series I keep recommending whenever someone asks me. Ladies and gentlemen, please welcome back fellow indie author and beta swapper Joleene Naylor!

Where do you live and write from?

We recently moved back to southwest Iowa, which is where I grew up at it. There are things I miss about southern Missouri, like the warmth, but there are things I’m enjoying. Like autumn was much autumn-ier here. The change of location hasn’t had any impact on my writing, except that the moving and house renovations put me behind.

Why do you write?

Hmmm. Everyone asks this question and I usually give one of the standard answers, but the truth is I don’t know. I took a writing break for a few years and I got back into it because I wanted to join a Harry Potter fan fiction/role play group. Then I started the vampire series because I wanted to write something dark…I guess I write because I can.

When did you start writing?

I used to write “books” when I was a kid, which went into my teenage and early adult years. (I have several novels stacked up in notebooks) but as I mentioned above I quit for a while and it was the Harry Potter Fans Around the Globe Yahoo group that got me going again. Wow, looking back on it those first few posts were terrible! It just shows if you don’t use it, you lose it.

CoL advert1What genre(s) do you write?

Speculative fiction. I have vampire series Amaranthine, but I have been considering doing a second fantasy series on the side if I ever get time, and then there is the meg project I have with a co-author. We may never finish it but by God we’ve made a go at it.

What does your writing routine consist of?

I need a routine, but alas it’s all very random. Everything I do is random. Sometimes I think a schedule would be great, but I never manage to stick to one.

What do you feel are your strengths as a writer? How have you developed these qualities?

I’m good at torturing characters. I’d actually like to torture them more than I do, but I try to stay lower key. I think that’s why the unpublished Patrick prequel had issues from beta readers – because I torture him a LOT.

Where do you find your inspiration? Do you put yourself in your stories?

This is where I am supposed to tell you about all the vampire series I read, but truth is I’m bad and I don’t. Most of my inspiration comes from anime. I’d love to see the Amaranthine series as anime or manga.

Outliner or improviser? Fast or slow writer?

Improviser most of the time. If I do an outline I feel like I’ve already written the book. And I’m slow. Mind numbingly slow. Probably because I lack that writing routine…

CoL for amazonTell us about your latest book

Clash of Legends is the seventh book in the series. It’s the end of a story arc and wraps up a lot of things that readers have been waiting for. Or I hope they’ve been waiting for it. For new readers, it could be read as a standalone if you don’t want to invest in six previous books.

The explosive seventh installment in the Amaranthine series brings blood, ruin, despair, and hope, for even in the darkest night there is still a moon.

After the battle in Indonesia. Katelina wakes in Samael’s domain. Though her memories are tattered, she knows someone is missing: Jorick.

Her vampire lover gathers an army to save her from the ancient, but his master Malick interferes. For five hundred years Malick has manipulated and ruined Jorick’s life. When he leaves Katelina broken and bleeding in the bowels of his oasis, it’s the final straw.

While Malick sets up his glorious war with a living legend, Jorick plans the ultimate taboo: to kill his master. He’s tried before and failed. Will this be different, or will he and Katelina be crushed in the carnage of a greater battle, between two whose blood goes back millennia?

Links:

amazon – http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00TR7IA36

B&N – http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/books/1121251968?ean=2940046584363

smashwords – http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/520737

apple – https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/clash-of-legends/id968843228?mt=11&uo=4

kobo – https://store.kobobooks.com/en-US/ebook/clash-of-legends

Indie publishing or traditional publishing – and why?

Indie. I like to control everything, and this way I can.

Any other projects in the pipeline?

I’m planning to rework that Patrick sequel I mentioned and give it away to people on my mailing list (you can sign up at http://www.joleenenaylor.com/books/newsletter.php ), There’s a short story collection I’d like to finish (Tales of the Executioners), and then the eighth book, of course. There are some people who think I should quit the series after the next book because it’s too many books for one series. What do you think?

What is your goal as a writer and what are you doing to achieve it?

I’m going to be honest again. I don’t ever expect to make a living from my books – it was hard before and is only getting harder. Many traditionally published authors don’t make a living wage, and there are even fewer indies who do. I just want to know that there are people who enjoy my stories. Sure, I’d like there to be hundreds, but you know what? When I had seven fans I was happy, too. So as long as people are enjoying it I’ll keep plugging along.

What is the best piece of writing advice you’ve ever been given?

That’s a tough question. I guess the best is to never give up and not to expect too much. Having goals is great, but none of us will be the next Stephen King just by putting a book on Smashwords. Be realistic, and then work towards whatever your goal is, whether it is to be the next Stephen King or just to entertain people.

joleene naylor 2About Joleene

author blog: http://joleenenaylor.wordpress.com/

FB author page: https://www.facebook.com/joleenenaylorbooks

twitter http://twitter.com/joleene_naylor

website- http://JoleeneNaylor.com

good reads: http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/3165393.Joleene_Naylor

facebook profile – http://facebook.com/joleene.naylor

pinterest – http://www.pinterest.com/joleenenaylor/boards/

google + – https://plus.google.com/102925915756209535618/posts

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