Sunday Surprise


And it’s a much revered guest! One of my first Goodreads friends! A lovely British gal I had the honor to meet in person after Loncon – she didn’t make it to Helsinki, but hopefully we’ll meet again in Dublin 2019. Or in London, whatever comes first, haha! Anyhow, she has a new book out, so check this interview! Ladies and gentlemen, please welcom J.A.Clement!

Where do you live and write from?

I live in the UK; I’m from the rural North but live in the South and work in London as my husband’s family live on the South coast.

Why do you write?

I write because I get twitchy if I don’t. I can only go so long without writing. Sooner or later it all bubbles up in me and life goes dull until I’m writing again. Then the gleam comes back.

When did you start writing?

I’ve always written, as far as I can remember. The first lengthy piece of writing I can remember was when I was eleven. My English teacher set us the task of writing three interlinked short stories. My friends did half a page each and grumbled about how hard it was. I didn’t dare tell them that mine were about twenty pages each and I’d had to ask for a new exercise book!

What genre(s) do you write?

Mostly fantasy, though I write contemporary humour under another name which I’m not going to tell you (as people will insist that they know who my characters are based on. I try to take that as a compliment that they seem so real, rather than being irritated. They’re not, but still…)

What does your writing routine consist of?

I write in my lunch hour when I get one, so it’s all a bit piecemeal. Sometimes in summer if I’m not too tired I write on the train instead of sleeping. If I’m really compulsively in the flow, I email myself bits of text while I’m in the lift or waiting for the kettle to boil or while tea is cooking. You’ll understand why editing is quite an important bit of the process for me!

Tell us about your latest book (add link if published)

My latest release is due tomorrow. A few years ago I wrote a Christmas story called A Sprig of Holly, about a girl called Greta. Recently I decided to revisit Greta for a novella called The Holly & the Ivy, which takes place a few years after when Greta’s daughter goes missing in a storm, and Greta finds out a little more about the help which came to her in the course of that first winter.

http://mybook.to/sprig_series

It’s almost fairytale /adventure style in tone – my other stuff is hardly the full grimdark but bad things happen to good people, whereas this is a lot lighter; gripping, I hope, but more like the sort of adventure story you used to get before everything went a bit dark and Nordic. A bit of light relief from an increasingly grimdark world, perhaps.

What is the best piece of writing advice you’ve ever been given?

Write the most excellent book you can, and then move onto the next one. It’s easy to get tangled up in self-doubt and over editing, but when it comes to it, you have to trust yourself and your editors, and release your book to the lions, so to speak. Readers will make up their own minds. In the meantime you need to not be wasting time doing stuff like hitting refresh in case a review comes up. There is so little time in this life to actually write, you just need to squash it in wherever there is two minutes spare, and get on with it. Once it’s written, the editing and polishing is time consuming but not generally outrageously difficult, but first you need to write it completely to the end or you’ll be perfecting chapter four for the rest of your life and never publish the damn thing at all.

Blog: http://jaclement.wordpress.com

fb: http://www.facebook.com/jaclementwrites

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Sunday Surprise


Since I skipped July, here’s some words of wisdom, writers on writing, inspirational quotes for writers, whatever you want to call them, to take you through the summer… Happy Sunday!

NO MATTER WHAT, KEEP WRITING.
William Gibson shared some advice on that phone call. First, never do a multibook deal. Second, don’t buy the big house. Sound counsel, although I was bummed that sinister monkeys weren’t somehow involved. He also said that many of his most successful writer friends are distinguished by the fact that they KEEP WRITING, rather than getting distracted by side projects or celebrity. The week before Cumulus came out, I finished the rough draft of my next novel. It’s currently in editorial and I’m gearing up to dive into a new story. Writing is the ultimate democratic artform. If you’re reading this post, you’ve probably written an email. If you’ve written an email, you can write a book. It might not be the Next Great American Novel, but it would be yours. If you’ve written a book, you can write a better one. If you’ve written a better one, then please don’t stop because I want to read everything you dream up. When it comes to storytelling, we are the only things standing in our way.
Eliot Peper

Learn to write by doing it. Read widely and wisely. Increase your word power. Find your own individual voice though practicing constantly. Go through the world with your eyes and ears open and learn to express that experience in words.
P.D. James

Simply put, your mission with your fiction is to entertain your reader enough for a few hours that they will want to buy more of your work.
If you take the attitude that you are always learning, always having fun, always practicing and trying to entertain people, you will discover you are more productive and sell more.
If you are having fun, entertaining yourself while you write, then your readers will feel that and be entertained as well.
You can sell your practice sessions, folks. Practicing has no pressure on it. Write clean, keep learning, and keep having fun.
That really is the secret.
Dean Wesley Smith

Publishing is a racket because most self-publishing authors see their books as an investment, when it’s actually a gamble. It’s a gamble because they don’t know how to reach their readers (or who their readers even are). They don’t know whether anybody will really enjoy their books. They hope to make some money from their books but because they didn’t write it for the money, they are OK with continuously spending more and more time, effort and money into their books even when they get zero results.
Publishing is a racket because the majority of people making money in publishing are the people selling services to authors. People selling services (myself included) get paid for their time and expertise, but have no interest helping you to make your book successful. (That’s not exactly fair, I should also point out that it’s because, in this business arrangement the author calls the shots and most first time authors make terrible choices, even when the people they hire for help try and get them to make better choices. There’s a built-in tendency towards self-sabotage when the least experienced person gets to make all the decisions).

Derek Murphy

Stories may well be lies, but they are good lies that say true things, and which can sometimes pay the rent.”
Neil Gaiman

Start writing, no matter what. The water does not flow until the faucet is turned on.”
Louis L’Amour

Sunday Surprise


And it’s a guest! Unexpected but welcome! Please, ladies and gentlemen, welcome Suzanne Kovitz!

Where do you live and write from?
Reisterstown, MD

Why do you write?
I wrote a novel entitled, “Enemy Self” because it was a form of escapism from life and I have a message of perseverance.

When did you start writing?
I began soon after college. The idea was founded in a dream.

What genre(s) do you write?
This a work of fiction with cross-over genres including sci-fi, fantasy, and YA.

What do you feel are your strengths as a writer? How have you developed these qualities?
I enjoy getting the reader right into the story without much intro and description. I also inserted inside voices as a narrative.

Where do you find your inspiration? Do you put yourself in your stories?
From life’s experiences. My story is more like a movie inside my head.

Outliner or improviser? Fast or slow writer?
Neither. I’m a slow hobby writer.

Tell us about your latest book

Enemy Self

Jessica Wheaton, a sweet and innocent high school girl, suddenly finds herself transformed into the body of her bully, Denise Bower.

She lives Denise’s life and experiences all the struggles Denise endures including child abuse, incest, drug experimentation, failing school grades, and dangerous relationships with men.

Finally escaping from an abusive home, Jessica (in the body of Denise) goes on a tumultuous journey of violence, drug addiction, rape and prostitution. She is in an endless search for love and true identity.

Will Jessica ever find a way to return to her body? Will she ever experience true love? How can she possibly defeat her enemy if she is her enemy?

Indie publishing or traditional publishing – and why?
Indie author. The traditionals wanted tried & true. Being an Indie author I can be in control of the book and its creative process.

Any other projects in the pipeline

Working on a memoir entitled, “Walking on Eggshells”

What is your goal as a writer and what are you doing to achieve it?

I would like to make my book available internationally. There are many and growing opportunities for indie authors now-a-days, including social media and podcast.

What is the best piece of writing advice you’ve ever been given?
NEVER, NEVER, NEVER GIVE UP

also known as Galaxy Quest’s motto “Never give up, never surrender” LOL! Thank you for stopping by! You can find Suzanne here or on Author Central.

 

 

Sunday Surprise


And it’s another Sci-fi July author! And I even met him three years ago, yay! Ladies and Gentlemen, please welcome Michael W. Lucas!

Where do you live and write from?

I live in Detroit, Michigan, and write from my authorial garret above my family home. As garrets go, it’s pretty nice. I have running water and a view of the power lines.

Why do you write?

Because I love doing it. I love telling stories. Good writing is clear thinking, and while my brain is usually full of mud writing forces me to sieve away the muck and produce clarity.

When did you start writing?

I was four when I discovered that books were not a gift from On High. They were produced by people–real people, not, like, TV stars or Presidents. People like me.

So I started writing books. And annoying my relatives and schoolmates with them. Now I get to annoy the world at large.

What genre(s) do you write?

As Michael Warren Lucas, I write SF and crime novels. I’m probably best known for the Immortal Clay books: a play off of Carpenter’s amazing The Thing, but set after we lose. I write just about anything as short stories.

As Michael W Lucas, I write nonfiction technology books. Nonfiction provides
some interesting storytelling opportunities. My fiction and nonfiction writing each feeds off the other.

What is your goal as a writer and what are you doing to achieve it?

I am always looking to become a better writer. Every book I write, I’m practicing a particular skill.

Writing is my full-time job, so I have business goals too. I’m looking to boost the share of my income that comes from fiction. Each novel I write sells better than the last, so the solution is pretty clear: write more novels.

What is the best piece of writing advice you’ve ever been given?

Writing advice is a weird thing. What’s great advice for a beginner is terrible advice for a medium-stage author and irrelevant for an advanced author.

The best writing advice I’ve ever been given actually isn’t writing advice, it’s life advice: “Listen to the people who are doing the thing you want to do, the way you want to do it.”

Hanging around with other writers and talking about writing is great fun. I’m thrilled to hang out with more experienced authors, and I’ll happily chat with writers that aren’t as far along as myself. But I’m really choosy about whose advice I listen to.

Many people who can’t do a thing talk a really good game about the thing. That guy in your writing group who is full of comments about your use of passive voice and how you break up paragraphs, but who has never sold a dang thing?  He’s not providing useful information.

When someone tells you how your work made them feel, though: that is ALWAYS valid and useful. Always. It’s the most useful writing advice you’ll ever get.

Outliner or improviser? Fast or slow writer?

I always have an outline. Permit me to present the complete outline for my crime thriller “Butterfly Stomp Waltz.” It’s utterly full of
robbery and bloodshed and vengeance.

Anthony Bourdain:

  • Atlanta
  • Portugal
  • Myanmar

Yep, that’s it. Food and travel shows are great for researching foreign places. If you can make the reader taste the food in that little town in the back of the Myanmar jungle, they’ll believe you’ve been there.

My writing speed depends entirely on the project. The novel I’m currently writing, a sequel to BSW called Terrapin Sky Tango, is being difficult.

Tell us more about your book in the bundle

In the Montague Portal series, the Montague Corporation has figured out how to leap into alien universes with different natural laws. Unfortunately, not all of those universes like humans.

More unfortunately, we bring human nature with us.

Mind rotting from an incurable prion disease? Go to a universe where the disease cannot progress, and get attacked by aliens (No More Lonesome Blue Rings). Or be among the first to visit a universe, solve a robbery, and save the world. (Sticky Supersaturation). There’s a universe where density varies linearly and there’s no ground… more specifically, no grounds for murder. (Forever Falls).

Montague Portal is kind of Star Trek, but every story has a built-in excuse to change how everything works.

Hydrogen Sleets is set in a universe exactly like ours, but it’s only about half a billion years after the Big Bang. The universe contains only hydrogen atoms screaming past at half the speed of light and a 1960s-style space station made of spinning concentric rings. It’s not just a SF mystery where our heroine needs to figure out why people are going insane and attacking the station; it’s a corporate procedural, where the frustrations of working for a company form part of the story. With laser guns, and forbidden shwarma.

It’s a perfect book for the Sci-Fi July Bundle. I was thrilled to be asked.

Tell us about your latest book

I describe git commit murder as “If Agatha Christie ran Unix cons.” If you work in the computing industry, if you’ve ever been to a computer conference, this book is for you.

Any other projects in the pipeline?

I’m currently writing a sequel to Butterfly Stomp Waltz, called Terrapin Sky Tango. Yes, I’m watching a few Anthony Bourdain episodes for that one. Plus a new, big nonfiction book.

Non-fiction Author

Fiction Author

Sunday Surprise


And it’s a Sci-fi July author! We even were in the same bundle last year! And I met him on the Oregon Coast this year! Ladies and gentlemen, please welcome Blaze Ward!

Where do you live and write from?

     “West of the Mountains, WA” USA

Why do you write?

     How do you make it stop?

When did you start writing?

     As long as I’ve had words. Professionally, about four years ago.

What genre(s) do you write?

    Primarily SF. Plus Fantasy, superhero, modern crime, and Post-apocalyptic-distopian-cowboy-stories

What is your goal as a writer and what are you doing to achieve it?

     Be the most successful writer nobody has ever heard of. (See Taupin, B.)

What is the best piece of writing advice you’ve ever been given?

     They only win if you stop.

Outliner or improviser? Fast or slow writer?

     I write into dimly-lit hallways, so I know where it starts, and roughly where it ends, and let the characters and the story direct me. Fast writer, but not as fast as Dean. 400k/year the last 2 years.

Tell us more about your book in the bundle

     I wanted to do something new for me and for a lot of what I’ve read. Hard SF archaeology, without gods, magic, or anything else. Focused on one person struggling to overcome her demons, and what it would really be like, exploring a potentially-hostile world.

Tell us about your latest book

     Flight of the Blackbird  5th of the Jessica Keller series. Epic Military Space Opera.

Any other projects in the pipeline?

     I will publish at least one thing on the 10th of every month for at least three years after I’d dead. Publishing four Science Officer books (5-8) this year, plus superhero stories and the cowboy collection.

____________________________________________
Web page
Facebook
Author Central

 

Random Friday


And since I don’t have much to say and it’s too hot for thinking, here’s another author of the fantasy bundle! Ladies and gentlemen, please welcome Mario Milosevic!

Where do you live and write from?

In the Columbia River Gorge in the Pacific Northwest.

Why do you write?

I want to be part of the long tradition of storytelling.

When did you start writing?

Submitted my first story (to Analog) when I was 14. (It didn’t get accepted.)

What genre(s) do you write?

Fantasy, mystery, science fiction, literary.

What is your goal as a writer and what are you doing to achieve it?

I want to sell enough to quit my day job. I write 1,000 words every weekday without fail, and I send stuff out all the time.

What is the best piece of writing advice you’ve ever been given?

Get a job. Most people don’t make a living at writing. Also, having other income frees you up to be as creative as you want in your writing.

Outliner or improviser? Fast or slow writer?

Improviser. When I outline, it feels dead. When I improvise it feels fresh and alive. Fast writer. Speed brings out things I never knew I had in me.

Tell us more about your book in the bundle

I live in the Columbia River Gorge, which is a beautiful place, and mystical as well. Our county has a law on the books which protects Bigfoot! Now how cool is that? I thought the gorge would be a perfect setting for a fantasy novel, so I imagined two societies, one in the gorge, and one above it. They are linked in ways I won’t give away here. I threw in some natural disasters from real life: The Missoula floods and the eruption of Mt. St. Helens (which is in our county) and I came up with an exciting coming of age story mixed with an after-the-apocalypse tale.

Tell us about your latest book

My most recent book is a collection of stories. The title says it all: 15 Strange Tales of Crime and Mystery. It’s got humorous, gruesome, futuristic, and fantastic, but they all deal with crime in some way or other. http://amzn.to/2tAWjXC

Any other projects in the pipeline?

Lots. I’m juggling numerous short stories, got a few novels making the rounds, and embarking on a series of stories about Red Fish Bay, my invented town on the Oregon Coast in which strange and mysterious things happen due to the fact that the town was the site of a meteor impact a few million years ago.

I don’t do much on social media, but here’s my twitter feed: https://twitter.com/mariowrites

My website: mariowrites.com

 

Sunday Surprise


And it’s another author of the Sci-fi July bundle! Yes, surprise! 🙂 I am honored to have an award-winning and bestselling author on this very humble blog. Ladies and gentlemen, please welcome Tracy Cooper-Posey!

Where do you live and write from?
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. I haven’t always been here—I was born in Perth, Western Australia and grew up in the country, running wild and barefoot. I miss the ocean. The Canadian Rockies are nice compensation, though.

Why do you write?
The answer to this has changed over the years. Right now, I write because it’s my profession. This is a particularly satisfying answer to me. For years I struggled to pay bills, ditch the day job, and do what I really wanted to do. Now I’m doing all that. I was singularly unsuited to day job work—I wasn’t qualified for anything. Now, I’m a professional writer. I earned my degree the hard way and it took twenty years.

When did you start writing?
I started writing, as in mucking around with stories and characters, when I was 14. I wrote the unofficial sequel to Star Wars. They didn’t call it fanfic then. I didn’t even know people wrote fanfic. I thought it was just me, being weird and strange. My English teacher caught me at it, told me to write something original and he would submit it for publication. I did, and he did. It didn’t go anywhere, of course (I don’t have those nine exercise books anymore, but I cringe to think what the writing was like)—but the seed was planted.
Fifteen years later, I started writing for publication. It took another four years to get published, then I sold two books in one week

What genre(s) do you write?
Space opera science fiction
Science Fiction Romance
Paranormal Romance
Time Travel Romance
Historical Romance
Romantic Suspense
Urban Fantasy Romance
Epic Norse Urban Fantasy Romance
Plus several varieties of mash-ups and oddities that really don’t fit anywhere, except that I wrote them, so there you have it.

What is your goal as a writer and what are you doing to achieve it?
To entertain readers for as long as my mental faculties hold together.
To pay the bills with my writing, which will let me entertain readers for as long as my mental faculties hold together.
What I’m doing to achieve it? I think I’m pretty much doing it already, by writing my knuckles off, every day I can. Reader reviews confirm I’m managing to entertain them, most of the time.

What is the best piece of writing advice you’ve ever been given?
Perfect writing technique doesn’t exist and even if you get close, if your story sucks you’ve still failed. Story rules.

Outliner or improviser? Fast or slow writer?
Oh, Outliner. To the max.
I’m considered kinda fast as a writer. I usuall do slightly more than one million words a year. Having said that, I know writers out there who have stockpiled 1.4M words for future publication. They make me feel very tortoise-like. It’s all subjective.

Tell us more about your book in the bundle
Faring Soul was my first attempt at juggling science fiction and romance in the 50/50 melding that the new science fiction romance sub-genre calls for. I think I pulled it off – the Galaxy Award it won seems to say I do. But it’s a tricky balancing act and not for the faint-of-heart.
Of course, now I love the stuff. I finished the series with three books, will probably start a spin off series in the near future, and have completed eight stories (so far) in another SFR series.

Tell us about your latest book (add link if published)
The very latest book, Soul of Sin, came out yesterday (as I write this). It’s historical romance and is getting some great reviews.
My latest SF or SFR to be released was the SFR novelette, Evangeliya, which came out a couple of weeks ago. It’s part of the eight books (so far) series I mentioned above – The Endurance series – and is set on a generational ship heading for a new home 1,000 years away from Earth.

Any other projects in the pipeline?
Do you have a few hours?😊
All my current series will have new books added by the end of the year, (here, for series information) and I’ll be adding a couple more series in 2018. Readers who would like to keep up should join my newsletter list. They can get a four-book starter library to sample my work and figure out if I do, indeed, entertain them.

________________________________

find Tracy online:

web page

Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

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subscribe to her newsletter

Tracy Cooper-Posey is a #1 Best Selling Author.  She writes science fiction and romance.  She has published over 90 books since 1999, been nominated for five CAPAs including Favorite Author, and won the Emma Darcy Award.

She turned to indie publishing in 2011. Her indie titles have been nominated four times for Book Of The Year and Byzantine Heartbreak was a 2012 winner.  Faring Soul won a SFR Galaxy Award in 2016 for “Most Intriguing Philosophical/Social Science Questions in Galaxybuilding”  She has been a national magazine editor and for a decade she taught writing at MacEwan University.

She is addicted to Irish Breakfast tea and chocolate, sometimes taken together. In her spare time she enjoys history, Sherlock Holmes, reading science fiction and ignoring her treadmill. An Australian Canadian, she lives in Edmonton, Canada with her husband, a former professional wrestler, where she moved in 1996 after meeting him on-line.

Writer Wednesday


Since I’m busy hopping through the French capital with Dear Nephew and only one of the authors of the sci-fi bundle agreed to answer my questions, I shall leave you in this gentleman’s company. I met him twice on the Oregon coast and am honored about it. We shared another sci-fi bundle last year that is no longer available so I was very happy that he accepted my invitation to join this crazy starship. Ladies and gentlemen, please welcome Russ Crossley!

Where do you live and write from?
I live in Gibsons, British Columbia, Canada. When we moved into our current house we built a couple of offices and a studio. I have my own writing office.

Why do you write?
I love stories and storytelling. I’ve been an avid reader all of my life. I want to tell my own stories.

When did you start writing?
About twenty years ago I started to write with the intention of being published.

What genre(s) do you write?
I have written in most genres except erotica and regency romance. I also write mystery but haven’t yet tackled cozy’s.

What is your goal as a writer and what are you doing to achieve it?
For right now I’m working on a space opera series of short novels called Blaster Squad that I love. I intend to continue writing these books for the foreseeable future. I want them to sell well so readers will enjoy them as much as I do. To achieve my goal I write the next book.
To continue to write. To achieve this I write every day. I also want to continue to grow my publishing company by publishing more titles and using the promotional tools out there such as bundle rabbit.

What is the best piece of writing advice you’ve ever been given?
Write what interests you. In my experience this yields the best stories.

Outliner or improviser? Fast or slow writer?
I’m an improviser once I settle on an idea for the next story. I tend to write in spurts once an idea strikes me as I write the story I’m currently working.

Tell us more about your book in the bundle.
Attack of the Lushites originated at a workshop many years ago. The idea was based on what if in the far future fast food companies ran the space program? It’s a satirical comedy about a hero named Jalapeño Popover and how he must take up the challenge to save the galaxy from an accidental invasion by aliens from another galaxy called the Lushites.

Tell us about your latest book (add link if published)
It’s book five in the Blaster Squad Series called Rise of the Empire. Blaster Squad is a team of mercenaries hired to face the most dangerous adversaries in the galaxy in the far future. The series is filled with adventure, action, and edge of your seat escapes against impossible odds. It’s space opera at its most thrilling. Here is the link to find out more.

Any other projects in the pipeline?
I’m currently working on Blaster Squad #6 Galaxy of Evil. The continuing adventures of the brave team of mercenaries takes them to edge of galaxy where they face their greatest challenge yet.

__________________

Find Russ online

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Sunday Surprise


And it’s a guest! That Diabolic Shrimp who likes to help authors like himself and gift readers with great books! I did promise he’d show up, didn’t I? Ladies and gentlemen, I proudly present you Joshua Grant!

Where do you live and write from?

I live and work in the beautiful city of Colorado Springs (United States). We have a bunch of mountains. They’re pretty. Something about them helps me write better.

Why do you write?

I typically write when I run out of cool stuff to read or watch. I also love to entertain people. So basically a blend of boredom and my need to be a goof have driven my writer’s bug.

When did you start writing?

Ironically, I started writing when I was 15 after I just finished a big standardized test. I needed something to do and we were allowed to free write so that’s what I did. Haven’t stopped since (writing, not standardized testing).

What genre(s) do you write?

I’ve published a Horror novel, but I also write Sci-Fi and Fantasy (mostly Young Adult). Horror was kind of a fluke for me, especially since I’m kinda a big scaredy cat, but I think it’s my best writing. I also like to scare people.

What does your writing routine consist of?

I’m not really sure I have a routine. I sharpen my pencils, sit down, and just start writing. I make sure I write at least a little everyday. I do everything long hand, then type it up when its finished (It’s my one chance to listen to music and sort of veg out), and then spend many months revising it.

What do you feel are your strengths as a writer? How have you developed these qualities?

My strengths as a writer mostly fall in the overall story. I’m good at coming up with a lot of unique ideas and mixing in a bunch of twists. I’m also really good at the description piece (I sometimes have to pull back on the description since I like to do that a lot). I think my creativity came from my over active imagination, which I’ve never turned away from. I’m a very visual person as well, so my ability to describe comes from my ability to visualize things.

Where do you find your inspiration? Do you put yourself in your stories?

I typically find my inspiration from other things I’ve watched and read. I also love to take some deep moral issue and build a compelling story around it. My Horror novel Pandora is an example of this. It’s built around the idea of finding hope in a hopeless dark situation. I actually don’t typically write myself into my work. Most of my characters are pretty different from me.

Outliner or improviser? Fast or slow writer?

I have a pretty solid outline for my work, but I never write it down. I keep all the outlines in my head. Whenever I write an outline down, I feel like I already wrote the book and don’t have any push to write it. When I actually get to writing though, I’m pretty fast. It’s the post rough draft part that takes me 8 million years to complete.

Tell us about your latest book (add link if published)

I’ve only published one book so far (I’ve got two more coming this year). My horror novel Pandora is about a cruise ship that goes missing. It re-emerges a week later transmitting a single word—Pandora—prompting an investigation by a Special Forces team. This book was tons of fun to write. I tried to capture all the frantic action, grotesque creatures, and hapless heroes of films like Aliens and The Thing from my childhood. Check it out at Amazon if you’re interested!

Indie publishing or traditional publishing – and why?

I used to be dead set on traditional publishing until this past year. Now I’m an Indie author and I love it. Traditional publishing is a nice way to go if you don’t like the business and marketing side of things. As I got into the business, I learned that I love the marketing piece. I love meeting people and supporting other authors. It’s been a lot of fun being in charge of every part of the process.

Any other projects in the pipeline?

I’ve finished the next book in my horror series, Jericho. This one involves a father and his son trying to survive the evil creatures that have infested the small mountain town of Shadow Pines. I also have a zany fun fantasy epic coming called Silly Tales from Albanon. I’ve decided to turn this one into a graphic novel which I’m pretty excited about. And as always, I’m hard at work growing my author support site Diabolic Shrimp. I support other authors through the site so if anyone’s interested, head to www.diabolicshrimp.com to check it out.

What is your goal as a writer and what are you doing to achieve it?

My goal as an author is three pronged. I intend to reach one million readers over the course of my writing. I’m currently pushing towards a thousand so I’m about a thousandth of the way there and I’ve only just begun! My second goal is to publish two books a year. Right now I’m on track to accomplish that one, but we’ll see how much Jericho keeps wrestling with me! And finally, my goal is to support at least 10,000 other authors through Diabolic Shrimp. My personal goal was to get 100 authors on Diabolic Shrimp within the first year of its existence (which we’re well ahead of schedule so far). Then next year I’ll expand that to 1,000 authors, then jumping to 10,000 the following year.

What is the best piece of writing advice you’ve ever been given?

Great writers write.

_______________________

Find Joshua online

webpage

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Sunday Surprise


Some words of wisdom, writers on writing, whatever you want to call it before the next batch of guests – if any! 😉 Have a great Sunday! 😀

So my advice to you is ignore what society tells you that you must do, ignore what friends tell you that you should do. Do what you want. So when you get to my age, you might be having as much fun as I am.

Ain’t easy, but it is worth it.

Dean Wesley Smith

But here is my point: you need to set goals that are realistic for you under the circumstances that you find yourself in.  If writing a page a day is all that you can manage with a busy schedule, it will still get a novel draft done in a year.  Setting goals that are difficult or impossible to reach will just stress you out, making it more difficult to write, and they’ll take a toll on the finished product.
Writing fifty pages of unusable prose in a day is no better than writing nothing at all.

David Farland

You have to surrender to your mediocrity, and just write. Because it’s hard, really hard, to write even a crappy book. But it’s better to write a book that kind of sucks rather than no book at all, as you wait around to magically become Faulkner.

No one is going to write your book for you, and you can’t write anybody’s book but your own.

I’m not really a sports person, but there’s that saying, ‘Keep your eye on the ball.’ I would imagine it’s easier to hit something if you’re looking at it, right? Well, in writing you have to keep your eye on the ball too, but some people mistake what the ball is. The ball is not the New York Times Bestseller List; the ball is not even publication. Your writing is the ball. Focus on writing your very best – your writing, and nothing else. Because no matter how brilliant your work is, there will always be some people who are going to hate it and tell you it sucks, so focus on making your work important to you, and at least to some people, and that’s perfectly good enough.

Cheryl Strayed

You go up the mountain of your idol, but when you get to the top, you realize they’re already there, and that mountain is never going to belong to you. So, you go do your own thing and it’s more of a shit-pile than a mountain at first, but it’s yours. It’s your shit pile. And that’s not nothing.

You can’t run from who you are. Not your brain, not your inclinations, or your experience. So accept your shit – run toward it, use it.

George Saunders

And so, my fellow aspiring-literary-superstars, if Cheryl Strayed’s advice boils down to “surrender to your own mediocrity” and Saunders’ advice is “go with your natural mode,” then my advice will be this: if you write, be brave enough to call yourself a writer, out loud and not just in some dark corner of your brain. It reaffirms what you’re here to do, what you love, what you’re working for, and what you should be doing instead of watching all those cat videos on YouTube (I just had to force myself to deactivate my Wi-Fi in order to finish this conclusion, I feel your collective pain). Because if Genius George Saunders says I’m a writer, then you sure the fuck are too, and I want us all to achieve greatness together.

Wes Janisen

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