Sunday Surprise


How do you make the paradigm shift from powerless writer to powerful owner of IP? The first shift has to happen in your own mind. Just because you haven’t yet licensed much of that IP doesn’t mean that the IP lacks value. The IP is waiting there for you to work with it, inside of publishing and out.

Seeing yourself and your work as valuable is tough for writers, particularly those who went through the “rigors” of an MFA, followed by all those years of begging traditional publishers to “buy” their work. All those experiences did was browbeat the writer into feeling unimportant and valueless—which couldn’t be further from the truth.

I’m a lot farther ahead on this road than most writers because I know business, and I’ve stood up for my writing for decades. I still ended up feeling battered and bruised because of the unhealthy relationships I had with some of my traditional publishers.

And if someone like me, who really didn’t want people to trample on my IP, could feel battered and bruised, I’m sure writers with no knowledge of business and no understanding of the legal sides of intellectual property, feel even more out of control and downtrodden.

When someone like that—like me, in some instance—is told they’re the one in control, they have a hard time believing it. But you can’t exercise control unless you know you have it.

Kris Rusch

Winning Edge and Finding Your Pace

Some books are like fine wine, and need time. They require a certain climate, fine weather, nurturing and an aging process. Michael Crichton, Larry McMurtry, Ken Follet, Amy Tan, etc. didn’t churn out books every two months and no one expected them to so.

Granted, some of the greatest works of literature were actually written VERY quickly (as I pointed out in my tongue-in-cheek post ‘Real Writers Don’t Self-Publish). Not all writers have the same pace. Not all stories require the same operational tempo.

Stephen King has written works that took eighteen months and others that took only a few days.

Publishing isn’t One-Size-Fits-All, or at least it shouldn’t be. But we are still enduring the birthing pains.

This said. With this drive for writers to push out content faster than a cartel meth lab, quality has taken a major hit. It’s also deluding a lot of people into believing they can take shortcuts.

That what we writers do is not an art, an artisan craft, a skill that requires YEARS and DECADES of training, learning, practice, classes, reading, and training to refine.

I believe we’ve gone far enough down this digital highway to come to a crossroad where we’ll need to choose.

When I began my journey years ago, the greatest hurdle I had was to get authors to understand we were in the entertainment business and that half of that word was business.

Now that has flipped.

We are still in the entertainment business, entertainment being half of that word. And I am actually excited about that, because I LOVE teaching craft.

Kristen Lamb

This next point is critical for authors to understand. In the new indie era, more millionaire authors have been created than in all prior publishing history. There will be even more in the future (woohoo) but your probability of becoming one has not changed (what?). Here is what I mean, and this has been validated by surveys I have done, author earnings I have received, as well as other sources.

The distribution of earnings has not changed, only the (n) population has changed.

The distribution (bell curve) is exactly the same as it used to be when it comes to the percentage (probability) of attaining a certain revenue level as an author. What has changed is the population that the distribution is applied to. The cold, hard facts are that 80% of authors will never make more than $10,000 in a lifetime from writing. Sixteen percent will make around $10,000 a year; everyone else making more is in that final four percent, including the millionaires.

Joe Solari

Continuous learning is critical for creatives and entrepreneurs. We need to keep filling the creative well, but also learn new skills and ideas and meet people outside our immediate niche. We cannot stay in the safety of the indie author echo chamber or we will find ourselves blindsided by changes to come.

– Joanna Penn

So don’t believe everything you hear. And if somebody tells you something about self-publishing, test it, try it for yourself. Because we’re all different. We all have different readerships. We’re at different stages in our career. And as we can see, things are constantly changing. So the only way to know whether something works or not for you is for you to give it a go and do everything in the spirit of “I’m trying this out. If it doesn’t work out, no worries I’ve learned.” So I take that learning into the next thing. Trying to get it right, trying to second guess the market, trying to do something that somebody else did. I see that not working all the time.

And understanding that we are in business. I think that’s the other core fundamental. It’s not the same to be in businesses as to have a career. They are two different choices in life. And if you’re running a business, up your business skills a little bit. I know a lot of authors have an aversion to business skills as a concept. The way they’re taught a lot is very dry and very boring. I get all that. I am that kind of person myself, but knowing the fundamentals of how business works, and what, you know what a good business person does.

Orna Ross

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