Wednesday Weekly Roundup


And here’s the last book of Before Future Earth Chronicles! πŸ™‚ On the cover Ram and Zarina, which makes my friend Shafali cringe because I put a Hindu boy with a Muslim girl, but that’s the point of the story! Romeo and Juliet with religion instead of feuding families! πŸ˜‰

This is a revision of Mumbai Dreams with a slightly different ending and pushed in the future. Here’s the full blurb of yhe ebook:

Two novellas at the time of the apocalypse and beyond.

β€œMumbai, 2060CE” tells the love story between Ram and Zarina – a completely revised edition of Mumbai Dreams.

β€œInheritor” tells the story of David, son of Daniel the vampire and Donna the alien human, kicked out of the alien facility where his parents live and exiled in the Himalayan Rainbow Town.

BONUS:

Excerpts from Rainbow Towns Journals

1. Claude Mancini, Rainbow Town Mont Blanc

2. Nour Shah, Rainbow Town Sahand

3. Jacob Davies, Rainbow Town Mount Mitchell

These three things will probably mixed with the other two books in the Omnibus that will come out in a couple of weeks. I realized I haven’t formatted that one yet because I probably haven’t decided the order in which to put the stories, since they sometimes overlap, LOL!

I mean, “Mumbai, 2060CE” is at the same time of part three of “Lockdown Begins” – same story from another point of view, should they be next to each other? Maybe I’ll put the journals first, since all three are mentioned in part one? I’ll think about it next weekend…

Last week I wrote my 10K although I spent most of the weekend cleaning up publishing stuff. I tried to change a few things on the publisher’s page and somehow screwed up, so I had to ask for help to Mighty Webmaster Admin who solved everything remotely. But I had to re-add the newsletter sign-up and when I tried to change the header picture, I couldn’t.

I did follow his instructions, but things changed in the WordPress dashboard and despite my attempts I couldn’t change the image. I won’t bother Mighty Webmaster Admin again – until the next problem. Already last week I had an email alert that something was wrong with the site, then I made a mess myself… Asking help 3 times in one week is way too much, I shall leave him alone for now! πŸ˜€

A business musing by Kris Rusch that reminded me why I’m in this still, ten years later. Yes, the world is changing, every norm has been shattered, it’s hard to predict where we’re going – and I didn’t see a rise in sales, but what she says about old traditional system and new indie publishing is still true.

And it breaks my heart that there are still young writers looking for agents. I guess I was lucky to be alive in the age of the typewriter. And in a country that didn’t have creative writing courses at the time (they started in the new millennium in case you’re wondering). And that Mom helped me understand that vanity publishers weren’t publishers and money flows to the writer and all that stuff.

I dreamed of being a writer in my teens too. But it was the 20th century, and already back then what felt awesome as soon as I wrote it became stale when I read it again two or five years later.

We change throughout our lives – I think I mentioned the various “stages” of my writing – and I’m still at a point where I hate everything I write, but I keep writing anyway because that’s what I do.

I’m a writer, I write. I’m the worst judge of my work, so I shall let readers and editors decide with their wallets. It’s a long term thing, a career, not an overnight, unsustainable success, and I will get there.

I discovered this article on Aphantasia, which actually matches my lack of setting, although probably for different reasons from the author of the article.

When I was younger I didn’t put a setting because I was too lazy, but I did see a movie in my head. Talking heads in white rooms mostly.Β Now I have trouble visualizing scenes, and sometimes I start thinking how I’d write it, instead of trying to visualize it.

What I mean is we change also in the way we express ourselves. I used to write down the movies in my head, dialog-heavy with a camera always on extreme close-up.

Now I’m more wordy and less visual, but the transition isn’t smooth. I still have trouble every now and then, and I try to visualize the scene, and then think how I could write it down – with the setting and everything.

Another thing that changed through the decades is going from real people in my stories (during my teens) to virtual casts of celebrities (from movies and music videos) to finding inspiration from stock images or DazStudio 3D rendering characters (although I still thow in Da Muses and other celebrities every now and then)

That’s probably why sometimes I cringe when I read older titles, but I’m not going to rewrite them They are the best stories I could write at the time, and I moved on since.

I don’t think I’m completely changing my voice now, at 50+ and after 15 years of switching to writing primarily in English! πŸ™‚

If I ever write something that doesn’t sound like me, I have another super sikrit pen name ready! πŸ˜€

Oh, and remember that contest for Cupid flash fiction/poems? I posted a flash fiction, but Tori, who posted after me, won the contest! So glad I sent her their way! Congrats, Tori! And you guys can go check that page and enjoy those valentine stories! πŸ™‚

Last but not least: more free books at IASFA! Go check the Alien SciFi free books page! The promotion runs from March 9-13!

Next week, the International Association of Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers (IASFA) will announce a science fiction book bonanza that is out of this world.

And if you’re anti-Zon (most IASFA autors are Kindle Unlimited), there’s also a BookFunnel giveaway with 150+ (!) SFF books! Ends at the end of the month…

And that’s all for today… have a great week!

4 Comments

  1. Victoria Zigler

     /  11/03/2021

    Funny thing is, I almost didn’t enter the contest. But I went to check it out, decided I’d enter if I could think of a poem in a certain amount of time, but if the time limit I set myself to think about it and write one that day passed without me doing it, I wouldn’t bother. I did manage to write one, so I posted it. Didn’t expect to win. But YAY! πŸ™‚

    How you do it is obviously up to you, but if it was me, I’d post them beside each other, with the journals first, since they’re mentioned in the other one. Just thought I’d tell you what I’d do, in case it helps you make up your mind. Feel free to ignore me though. πŸ˜‰

    Details like that are why I do revisions/rewrites before I let people read anything. I’m good at imagery – it’s my poet’s soul, I think – but I’m always really vague about it, and only really mention vital details, when I’m doing the first draft of an actual story. After I get the story down, that’s when I go back and add those details, and turn my characters from floating heads to functioning creatures (I say, “Creatures,” to allow for animal characters). Could you maybe try doing that yourself?

    I revised and did a bit of rewriting on my old stuff as I got it ready to publish, but once it’s published I have a strict policy against going in and rewriting my stories and poems, otherwise I’d be forever doing rewrites. At some point you just have to let it be and move on to the next piece of writing. Some of them really don’t look that good to me any more, and most of them I feel could be improved on at least a little, but they were the best I could do at the time, like you said, so they stay as they are. I’ll just try and do better in future. Of course, I’ll then not like that stuff in a few years time, but that’s OK, because it shows growth as a writer, which is a good thing. πŸ˜‰

    Liked by 1 person

    • And I’m glad you submitted and won! πŸ™‚ I did vote for you, although I doubt it was my input to make you win!
      Re: writing – I also write the bones first and add the meat later, but I’m changing the way I do it. While when I was younger it was direct-to-movie, now it’s more β€œHow would I write this as a prose piece?”
      And yes, showing growth as a writer is a good thing, because readers are all different and you never know which book they’ll stumble upon first. I think the author voice remains more or less the same, though, hence once they find you, then can binge-read you! πŸ™‚
      Happy writing!

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  2. Victoria Zigler

     /  11/03/2021

    I expect your input helped, and thanks. πŸ™‚

    Whatever works for you. I did notice there was more detail in the newer books, if that helps any. Oh, and on that note: yes, I agree. We just need people to stumble across our work to start with. At least we both have plenty for them to read when they do. πŸ˜‰

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    • Yep, we’re ready for them! Now, if we could find a serendipitous way to put our covers under their eyes, so they can hit that BUY button… 😊

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