Random Friday


Since I don’t have anything new to report, here you go with words of wisdom, writers on writing, whatever you want to call them! Have a great weekend! 🙂

The formula for long-term success is easy.

1… Write what you love, what entertains you.

2… Learn continuously about the craft of telling stories.

3… Learn continuously about the business of publishing.

4… Learn continuously about how to handle a business and money.

5… Write more stories and novels than anyone else.

You want to study how I went from stalled to making lots of money with my writing?

Just buy all 36 issues of Smith’s Monthly and study them. 36 novels, 160 plus short stories, tons of articles and non-fiction, serial novels, and so on. And realize I laid out the first thirty of those issues out, from cover to interior to ads. Yes, I did the work on them as well until just last spring.

Write that much in three years, keep learning, and find innovative ways to get your stories to readers and you will be surprised how much money you can make.

But you can’t do that writing to market. At least not for long.

Only writing for love will allow you to maintain that pace and have fun at the same time.

So now I have, as Heinlein said, “Given away the secret.” Now anyone can do it.

Anyone can, actually.

Have fun.

Dean Wesley Smith

If we add up the sheer volume of TIME involved in the old way, why are we griping that we have been self-published three years and aren’t yet J.K. Rowling?

I have mentioned the problems with Millennial Authors (these are writers who have “come of age” during the digital revolution and they could be 22 or 67). I know the “old way” wasn’t better, but it does lead me to believe that writers of the “old days” have better tenacity because they didn’t enter the profession in the Age of Instant.

Yes, our first book might only sell a handful of copies. But guess what? In the “old days” odds were we would only sell a small number of copies as well (refer to statistics above). But, unlike the “old days” we can keep writing more books. We can keep at it until something sticks or until we decide to move on.
Kristen Lamb

2017 is going to be fascinating because the world economic situation is in flux, just like our industry is in flux. What we do know is this: People read books in good times, and people read books in bad times. We just have to figure out how to get people to read our books.

How do we do that?

First, we write the best damn stories we can. That’s why people read. They want to escape (or get information and escape, in the case of nonfiction).

Second, we produce the best product we can, in as many formats as we can manage, so that our readers have choice.

Third, we let our readers know that a book is available. Note that Open Road succeeded by putting backlist books on bestseller lists. Five years ago, traditional publishers said such things were impossible.

Fourth, we plan for the good and the bad. Readers want us to keep writing. They want their favorite authors to publish as many books as possible as fast as possible. Readers also know that we’re not machines, so they move to other writers while they wait for us. But readers will wait.

So if you’re having a rough year, figure out what it will take to survive that rough year. Then return. And as you plan for your future after that rough year, plan for the good and the bad. Try to be debt free. Try not to overpromise. Start learning your business and grow, slowly, so that you can be around ten years from now.
Kris Rusch

To me sketching is like taking notes of thoughts. You practice and practice to build up that sense of shape, form and beauty, but not to just do beautiful drawings or paintings. I think too many artists are obsessed with doing a perfect drawing every time. It is not about doing a nice drawing every time, it is about being able to do a nice drawing when you need it. That is why you practice, that is why I doodle.
– Claire Wendling (Barb’s note: this applies to writing as well… just sayin’!)

(…) there are so many layers of competency you have to take on in writing science fiction and fantasy. When your writing concerns only reality, there are things you don’t need to question. Writing science fiction and fantasy means you need to question whether there’s even a sun. And then question what direction that sun comes up in and what color it is.
– Nalo Hopkinson

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